Kapila

Created by Jijith Nadumuri at 23 Jul 2011 15:57 and updated at 23 Jul 2011 15:57

VISHNU PURANA NOUN

vp.1.21 The children of Kasyapa by Danu were Dwimurddha, sankara, Ayomukha, sankusiras, Kapila, Samvara, Ekachakra, and another mighty Taraka, Swarbhanu, Vrishaparvan, Puloman, and the powerful Viprachitti; these were the renowned Danavas, or sons of Danu 4.
vp.2.2 The principal mountain ridges which project from the base of Meru, like filaments from the root of the lotus, are, on the east, sitanta, Mukunda, Kurari, Malyavan, and Vaikanka; on the south, Trikuta, sisira, Patanga, Ruchaka, and Nishadha; on the west, sikhivasas, Vaidurya, Kapila, Gandhamadana, and Jarudhi; and on the north, sankhakuta, Rishabha, Naga, Hansa, and Kalanjara. These and others extend from between the intervals in the body, or from the heart, of Meru 9.
vp.2.3 Suprayoga 28 Pavitra 29, Kundala, Sindhu 30, Rajani 31, Puramalini, Purvabhirama, Vira, Bhima 32, Oghavati, Palasini 33, Papahara, Mahendra, Patalavati 34, Karishini, Asikni, the great river Kusachira 35, the Makari 36, Pravara, Mena 37, Hema, and Dhritavati 38, Puravati 39, Anushna 40, Saivya, Kapi 41, Sadanira 42, Adhrishya, the great river Kusadhara 43, Sadakanta 44, siva, Viravati, Vastu, Suvastu 45, Gauri, Kampana 46, Hiranvati, Vara, Virankara, Panchami, Rathachitra, Jyotiratha, Viswamitra 47, Kapinjala, Upendra, Bahula, Kuchira 48, Madhuvahini 49, Vinadi 50, Pinjala, Vena, Tungavena 51, Vidisa 52, Krishnavena, Tamra, Kapila, Selu, Suvama 53, Vedaswa, Harisrava, Mahopama 54, sighra, Pichchhala 55, the deep Bharadwaji, the Kausiki, the Sona 56, Bahuda, and Chandrama, Durga,
vp.2.4 The Sura sea is entirely encircled by Kusa dwipa, which is every way twice the size of the preceding continent. The king, Jyotishmat, had seven sons, Udbhida, Venuman, Swairatha, Lavana, Dhriti, Prabhakara, and Kapila, after whom the seven portions or Varshas of the island were called Udbhida, &c. There reside mankind along with Daityas and Danavas, as well as with spirits of heaven and gods. The four
vp.2.13 The king having ascended his litter, on one occasion, was proceeding to the hermitage of Kapila, on the banks of the Ikshumati river 8, to consult the sage, to whom the virtues leading to liberation were known, what was most desirable in a world abounding with care and sorrow. Amongst those who by order of his head servant had been compelled gratuitously to carry the litter was the Brahman, who had been equally pressed into this duty, and who, endowed with the only universal knowledge, and remembering his former existence, bore the burden as the means of expiating the faults for which he was desirous to atone. Fixing his eyes upon the pole, he went tardily along, whilst the other
vp.2.14 Parasara. Having heard these remarks, full of profound truth, the king was highly pleased with the Brahman, and respectfully thus addressed him: "What you have said is no doubt the truth; but in listening to it my mind is much disturbed. You have shewn that to be discriminative wisdom which exists in all creatures, and which is the great principle that is distinct from plastic nature; but the assertions I do not bear the palankin the palankin does not rest upon me the body, by which the vehicle is conveyed, is different from me the conditions of elementary beings are influenced by acts, through the influence of the qualities, and the qualities are the principles of action; what sort of positions are these. Upon these doctrines entering into my ears, my mind, which is anxious to investigate the truth, is lost in perplexity. It was my purpose, illustrious sage, to have gone to Kapila Rishi, to inquire of him what in this life was the most desirable object: but now that I have heard from you such words, my mind turns to you, to become acquainted with the great end of life. The Rishi Kapila is a portion of the mighty and universal Vishnu, who has come down upon earth to dissipate delusion; and surely it is he who, in kindness to me, has thus manifested himself to me in all that you have said. To me, thus suppliant, then, explain what is the best of all things; for thou art an ocean overflowing with the waters of divine wisdom." The Brahman replied to the king, "You,
vp.3.2 In the Krita age, Vishnu, in the form of Kapila and other inspired teachers, assiduous for the benefit of all creatures, imparts to them true wisdom. In the Treta age he restrains the wicked, in the form of a universal monarch, and protects the three worlds 15. In the Dwapara age, in the person of Veda vyasa, he divides the one Veda into four, and
vp.4.4 The progeny of Sagara: their wickedness: he performs an Aswamedha: the horse stolen by Kapila: found by Sagara s sons, who are all destroyed by the sage: the horse recovered by Ansumat: his descendants. Legend of Mitrasaha or Kalmashapada, the son of Sudasa. Legend of Khatwanga. Birth of Rama and the other sons of Dasaratha. Epitome of the history of Rama: his descendants, and those of his brothers. Line of Kusa. Vrihadbala, the last, killed in the great war.
vp.4.4 Asamanjas was from his boyhood of very irregular conduct. His father hoped that as he grew up to manhood he would reform; but finding that he continued guilty of the same immorality, Sagara abandoned him. The sixty thousand sons of Sagara followed the example of their brother Asamanjas. The path of virtue and piety being obstructed in the world by the sons of Sagara, the gods repaired to the Muni Kapila, who was a portion of Vishnu, free from fault, and endowed with all true wisdom. Having approached him with respect, they said, "O lord, what will become of the world, if these sons of Sagara are permitted to go on in the evil ways which they have learned from Asamanjas! Do thou, then, assume a visible form, for the protection of the afflicted
vp.4.4 At that period Sagara commenced the performance of the solemn sacrifice of a horse, who was guarded by his own sons: nevertheless some one stole the animal, and carried it off into a chasm in the earth, Sagara commanded his sons to search for the steed; and they, tracing him by the impressions of his hoofs, followed his course with perseverance, until coming to the chasm where he had entered, they proceeded to enlarge it, and dug downwards each for a league. Coming to Patala, they beheld the horse wandering freely about, and at no great distance from him they saw the Rishi Kapila sitting, with his head declined in meditation, and illuminating the surrounding space with radiance as bright as the splendours of the autumnal sun, shining in an unclouded sky. Exclaiming, "This is the villain who has maliciously interrupted our sacrifice, and stolen the horse! kill him! kill him!" they ran towards him with uplifted weapons. The Muni slowly raised his eyes, and for an instant looked upon them, and they were reduced to ashes by the sacred flame that darted from his person 3.
vp.4.4 When Sagara learned that his sons, whom he had sent in pursuit of the sacrificial steed, had been destroyed by the might of the great Rishi Kapila, he dispatched Ansumat, the son of Asamaujas, to effect the animals recovery. The youth, proceeding by the deep path which the princes had dug, arrived where Kapila was, and bowing respectfully, prayed to him, and so propitiated him, that the saint said, "Go, my
vp.4.4 son, deliver the horse to your grandfather; and demand a boon; thy grandson shall bring down the river of heaven on the earth." Ansumat requested as a boon that his uncles, who had perished through the sage s displeasure, might, although unworthy of it, be raised to heaven through his favour. "I have told you," replied Kapila, "that your grandson shall bring down upon earth the Ganges of the gods; and when her waters shall wash the bones and ashes of thy grandfather s sons, they shall be raised to Swarga. Such is the efficacy of the stream that flows from the toe of Vishnu, that it confers heaven upon all who bathe in it designedly, or who even become accidentally immersed in it: those even shall obtain Swarga, whose bones, skin, fibres, hair, or any other part, shall be left after death upon the earth which is contiguous to the Ganges." Having acknowledged reverentially the kindness of the sage, Ansumat returned to his grandfather, and delivered to him the horse. Sagara, on recovering the steed, completed his sacrifice; and in affectionate memory of his sons, denominated Sagara the chasm which they had dug 4.

Search more about this:-

Share:- Facebook

Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License